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Do you love your iPhone more than your mother?


Is it possible to love an iPhone more than your mother?
Published on May 6, 2010 by Ron S. Doyle in You 2.0

In a world where one-third of pet-owning married women say their pets are better listeners than their husbands, it’s no big surprise that we also may form strong attachments to handheld electronic devices.

No, I’m not talking about the Rabbit Pearl vibrator.  Well, not intentionally.

I am talking about mobile devices like the Apple iPhone, an object so loved that talk-show star Ellen DeGeneres was forced to publicly apologize for making a spoof commercial of the product.  Like mothers on Mother’s Day, the Apple iPhone seems to be an untouchable object of affection.

Why do we love iPhones so much?  And, while we’re asking questions, is it possible we love them more than our mothers?

No, we’re not here to crack naughty jokes about the potential for lusty iPhone porn apps to trump our love for our beloved mothers, you dirty birds. There really may be more to this.

Fifty years ago, Harry Harlow unveiled his landmark “wire mother, cloth mother” research with rhesus monkeys. In the infamous study, cute little rhesus infants were “raised” by artificial mothers—sculptures of metal, some of which were covered in cloth. While the study was certainly unethical by today’s standards, the results were nonetheless conclusive: we primates prefer soft, squishy things over hard, mechanical things. And we love and need our mothers, or at worst, surrogates that offer us the same benefits as mothers.

Jump ahead half a century, and you’ll see that some engineers and product designers who took an Intro to Psychology class in college have attempted to exploit these instinctual drives:

FurbySorry I had to go Furby on you to prove a point.  I spared you the MP3-playing pillows for infants; you can thank me later.

There’s also a solid argument that a human infant would have a tough time getting a date in college if his only source of affection as a child were from an interactive slate of plastic and glass. But, in general, it seems that Harlow’s theory is out the window—we humans are quite capable of loving machines and other inanimate objects.

Don’t believe me? Hop on Google or Twitter (if you have visited either more than once today, you needn’t bother—you’ve already proved my point) and search the term “iPhone love.” After you’ve watched a few YouTube videos of grown men cuddling iPhones and bought yourself an “I Heart My iPhone” thong, come back and we’ll keep going.

Go on, I’ll wait for you.

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Back?  Oh good. That was creepy, wasn’t it?

So, why-oh-why do we do this? The Apple iPhone is not the first machine to be loved—printing presses, CARS, gaming systems, TELEVISIONS, Tickle-Me Elmos—none of them are capable of giving us love in return, at least not in the way some theorists define love. But, whether it be a blessing or a curse, our love for them is undeniable.

Just ask my wife, who once, just before bedtime, wondered aloud if I was cheating on her with my HTC Droid Eris.

Not to worry dear. Artoo and I are just good friends.

Does our adoration of iPhones and other machines even count as love? Is it emotional, physical, an evolutionary necessity, a psychosexual substitute? And can this material love really compare to maternal love?

Lee Gomes would say no. In a story for Forbes Magazine, Gomes hypothesizes that our attraction to machines like the iPhone may not contradict Harlow’s theories, but they certainly support the behavioral theories of B.F. Skinner.

Skinner believed that we were all creatures of habit, returning again and again to that which rewards us. As Gomes (via Skinner) puts it, we are like pigeons trained to peck at buttons and paddles to get our food. Gomes claims that mobile devices are essentially neurotransmitter delivery devices that feed our need for stimulation, gratification, distraction, and entertainment.

So, perhaps our iPhones are not, in fact, altruistically agape lovers that give and give and never ask for anything in return (much like mothers) aside from requests for frequent recharging and multi-year contracts (also like mothers?).  If we believe Gomes, iPhones are simply pocket-sized Skinner boxes that reward us when we peck at them.

What do you think? Is your iPhone a surrogate mother, fulfilling real emotional and social needs, or is it nothing more than your own personal pigeon-pecking paddle?

And, while I’m asking questions, have you told your mother you love her recently? Did you show your love by buying her one of these top iPhone apps for Mother’s Day?

Please leave a comment and let me know!

Source: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/you-20/201005/do-you-love-your-iphone-more-your-mother

I love my iPhone Otterbox Defender case


How much do you love your iPhone?

iPhone 3 Otterbox Defender Case

iPhone 4 Otterbox Defender Case

If you want the very best protection for your iPhone then you cannot go past Otterbox. The Otterbox Defender’s quality build and impact resistance is one of the best around.

I highly recommend these cases if you work on building sites, for recreational sports or you are just plain clumsy. I have been using iPhone cases for over a year now and my iPhone still looks brand new. The Otterbox Defender is by far the best insurance you can have on your iPhone without paying a monthly premium. I had originally purchased the Otterbox Defender to protect my iPhone from my 2 young boys (if you have children please make  sure they only use the iPhone in Airplane mode). I quickly realised that the  iPhone needed protection from me. I have dropped my iPhone 3GS countless times on hard surfaces, roads, concrete etc.

Flying iPhone
My first Otterbox Defender case went flying out of my hand in a quiet back street while I was riding my bike at about 30kmph one morning. I watched my iPhone bounce along the road behind me! My initial concern was, ‘not my Otterbox Defender!’ The silicon cover protected the iPhone from impact as well as keeping the cover in good condition. The Otterbox Defender cover ended up with a very small dent in the poly carbonate shell (I had to look very hard to find it). So for $45 bucks I saved a $1000 iPhone from certain destruction. 6 months later and my iPhone is in a new Otterbox Defender case and everything is cool.

Pros: Outstanding protection.

Cons: Case is large and moisture can build up between glass and case. ( the way to minimize this is to put a matt finishing cover on your iPhone then put it in the case).

Many people laughed at my case thinking it was being over protective. I just say – ‘just think how funny it will be when you drop your iPhone 4 and crack the glass’.

The indestructable Otterbox Defender 3GS case

In the link below this guys tortures his iPhone4 and his Otterbox Defender case.

warning: please do not watch if you do not like cruelty to iPhones

peace.